Commonwealth Company Develops Solution to Help Save Lives of Motorists in Britain and Beyond

Steven Warner, Commercial Manager for IMR Technologies in Britain, explains: “Should a vehicle be in a collision, our IMR Sentinel will immediately call the emergency services and share the vehicle’s precise geo-location, its make and model details and its circumstances, for example, if it is lying on its roof.

An Australian company’s investment of years and millions of dollars in devising a pioneering solution to the European Union’s challenge of requiring all new car and light commercial vehicle models sold in the EU from 31 March 2018 to be fitted with 112-based eCall (the Pan-European cellular emergency system for motor vehicles) technology, has been hailed a success.  

Speaking at his facility in Perth, Western Australia, Managing Director of IMR Technologies, Martyn Gilbert, says: “I am very pleased to report that our IMR Sentinel In-Vehicle-System was ruled compliant with the EU standard EN16454, our device having passed each and every rigorous test. Compliance certification means that it is recognised and deemed appropriate for fitting to new vehicle models.

“It is only right that the tests were demanding as the eCall technology has to be robust and reliable, given that its purpose is to alert the emergency services to the accident and provide information that will help them respond promptly, especially in situations where the Golden Hour may prove critical, and potentially save lives.  Fundamental to the concept behind the system is that it must be free to use and not require a subscription to make it work. In addition, it must link directly to the emergency services’ operator.

“We’re proud to have achieved this significant milestone. Attaining the conformance status is the culmination of an extensive and expensive development and testing programme in Europe and Australia.”

The driver or passengers of a vehicle fitted with the technology can activate a 112 eCall, or the compliant device will automatically make the eCall when vehicle sensors register a collision. The IMR Sentinel was subjected to a battery of tests, including being accelerated and stopped sharply to simulate a 75 g-force impact. It successfully survived and continued with its transmission of alert messages.

Steven Warner, Commercial Manager for IMR Technologies in Britain, explains: “Should a vehicle be in a collision, our IMR Sentinel will immediately call the emergency services and share the vehicle’s precise geo-location, its make and model details and its circumstances, for example if it is lying on its roof.  The occupants of the vehicle may be incapable of making the emergency call themselves via their cell phones but, regardless, the device will do it for them.”

Martyn Gilbert of IMR concludes: “The EU ruling is based on the recognition that providing the emergency services with relevant information, including a precise location, the instant that a collision occurs, can slash the services’ response time by 50% in rural and 40% in urban settings. It is anticipated that this time-saving element arising from the eCall and its data will offer those involved and injured more chance of treatment with the Golden Hour – the first sixty minutes following an accident.  Now that the IMR Sentinel is ruled compliant, if and when fitted to new car and LCV models, our device has the potential to save lives, and that makes our investment truly worthwhile.”